Lesson Plans

May 25, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • Reddit: How do people say goodbye on the phone in Korean?
    • “I just realised I’ve never really thought about it. Do they even say goodbye, or just pick up on a cue that the conversation is over?”
      • (I think a Brit wrote this. Why?)
    • Mostly they just say 네 back and forth and draw it out longer till someone hangs up.
      • Haha true. There’s other ways too but this is done for sure. Or 들어가/끊어 followed by 응 x5 from both sides
      • 네, you hang up!
    • ‘어, 끊을게, 어~, 어~’ <- I may say like this.
    • My girlfriend would say ” 뿅~ ” lol
      • I am 31 and I still say 뿅!
      • Hahahaha it’s kinda old fad word
        • Oh young people don’t say that these days?
          • Yeah I used to say it when I was 15 ish… Im now 34 lol
  • Lol literally just 네 with rising intonation till someone hangs up. It’s so awkward to me as a native English speaker
    • It sounds similar to the UK tbh, I feel like everyone says ‘ bye-bye ‘ like 10 times before hanging up lol
      • As a Korean American who used to live in the UK, this is the most validating reddit thread I’ve ever seen
  • Fiancé is Korean, can confirm – even when we’re speaking in English. Sometimes there is a noise or phrase that indicates we’re hanging up, “Drive safely,” “See you in a bit,” “응.” Sometimes it’s just, click and silence.
  • 끊어~
  • 네ㅔㅔㅔ
  • They don’t really say goodbye on the phone, they just say something like 응
  • With someone I’m familiar with and use informal tone “어~~~” or “응~~~~” and if its the same at the other end, I hang up.

    If it’s with my boss or someone I use formal speech, I say something like “네.” “네, 알겠습니다.” or “네, 내일에/다음에 뵙겠습니다”
  • With all non-native Korean speakers who also don’t speak English: we say 안녕~ to each other and then hang up.

    With Koreans: everyone else’s answers are spot on with 끊어.
  • My mother-in-law just says mutters sounds and hangs up ~depending on the person. Like – ugh, ah, mmmMM
  • My MIL just tells me she’s gotta go somewhere or that she’s going to call someone else lol. My husband either says he loves me or 응. With others it’s that long drawn out 네ㅔㅔㅔㅔ and then one of us hangs up. When I first moved here I found it weird but now it’s just funny

    So as you can see there are quite a few different answers here, that’s because it depends on context, the relationship, and even the person’s personality. So most of the answers here are correct, just used by different people in different ways.

    Definitely the most common is a cue ending the conversation followed by the exchange of “네~~” or “어~~” depending on if you’re using 존댓말 or 반말.

    There is no set cue, it’s just something that hints that the conversation is over – this could be something as vague as “아…네 알겠습니다~~~”. This is often also accompanied by drawing out the sentence. E.g., in this instance if you said just said “알겠습니다” in standard tone/speed like you would in conversation, they might not necessarily pick up that you’re ending the conversation.

    This can seem strange to English speakers at first, it’s definitely worth observing in real life (or through videos) as to how this is often done.

    There are also other ways listed in here such as 들어가세요, 끊어, 끊을게요 etc. but I don’t have time to go into these right now unfortunately!
  • 응 끊어~ is pretty standard for family/married folks
  • (Post) We Need to Talk About ‘The Giving Tree’
  • NY Times – We Need to Talk About ‘The Giving Tree’
    • Kids — and parents — need to understand that there’s a big difference between selflessness and generosity.
    • If you’re rusty on the story, it’s about a boy who loves a tree. As he grows up, he visits her repeatedly. He takes her apples and sells them for personal profit, removes her branches so he can build a house, and chops down her trunk so he can build a boat and sail away. In the end, the tree has nothing left to give and is reduced to a stump. It wasn’t the warm, fuzzy, heartwarming story we thought we remembered. Despite being poignant and beautifully written, it was kind of depressing.
  • Korea JoongAng Daily – Blood types, palm reading, now MBTI: Korea’s love for categorizing

    Apple
    • Apple. What was the first thing that just popped into your mind? If it’s something like “red” or “sweet,” the second letter of your MBTI personality type may be an S. If you instead think of Snow White or an iPhone, the letter could be N.
    • What other indicators do Koreans believe can be used to categorize people?
    • Before the MBTI went viral, blood type was the most common way through which people would try to predict others’ personalities and categorize them.
      • There are four main blood types — A, B, AB and O — determined by the genes inherited from one’s parents. In Korea, blood types are widely believed to be closely related to people’s personalities. There is, however, no solid scientific evidence supporting this.
      • Do you know your blood type?
      • Which blood type description most matches you?
        • People with blood type XX are usually very diligent and friendly but have very sensitive personalities. They are thought to be less likely to express themselves to others and prefer to be alone rather than involved in groups as they feel uncomfortable in crowded areas.
        • People with blood type XX are known to be very outgoing and passionate. But on the flip side, they can be very arrogant. There is also a saying that males with XX blood types are playboys.
        • People with blood type XX are said to be the most suitable as leaders and coworkers as they are very practical, have good communication skills and easily build close relationships with others. But they are known to be less responsive on the outside as they hesitate to express their true feelings due to the fear of rejection.
        • People with the blood type XX, which is the xxxxxxxxx in Korea, can show various personalities depending on their feelings, mood or situations, and sometimes have no control over it. Oftentimes they are stereotyped as geniuses or psychos.
      • 12-year zodiac cycle
        • Another tool by which Koreans categorize people is the 12-year zodiac cycle, similar in ways to Western astrology. Twelve animals represent each year, according to the lunar calendar, and the years repeat in a cycle every 12 years. Koreans call the lunar animal years ddi, which roughly translates to sign, referring to the year in which they were born, and have set beliefs that people have particular characteristics based on their ddi.
        • So in Korea, people with a 12-year age difference would say they have the same ddi and feel a sense of kinship with each other.
        • The 12 zodiac signs in order are rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog and pig. The tradition originates from ancient China, and according to folklore, the order was set based on the results of a race among the animals. 
        • For instance, 2022 is the Year of the Tiger, and also the year for the people with tiger ddi. People with tiger ddi are known to be independent and have high self-esteem, making them suitable leaders. But they are also said to be very arrogant and have a hard time building close relationships with others.
        • The year of 2023 will be the Year of the Rabbit, and people with rabbit ddi are known to be nice and gentle and try to avoid conflicts with others. But they can be a bit passive and lazy.
        • Other examples would be that people with rat ddi are smart and talented, but quite reckless and impatient. People with ox ddi are patient, diligent, honest, and have a strong sense of responsibility.  
  • Chosun Ilbo – The Best Weight Loss Plan? Eating a Little Less
    • “The key to this diet is losing around 50 g of fat a day. Doing this for three months has the effect of cutting 4.5 kg of fat….”
      • I think this, “50g per day”, is the key to success in everything. I think success is “small and everyday”.
      • I often ask my children and students in my class “is success big or small?” They often say “big”. I tell them that successful people know that success is small. People who aren’t successful think success is big; People who aren’t successful see the big results of small differences, but successful people know that success comes from the small differences that accumulate.
  • Global Audio Book: The Amazing Jar (VOD)
    • YouTube – The Amazing Jar (Illustrated Audiobook)
    • Do you know this story?
    • Is this story well known in Korean culture?
    • Do Korean parents tell this story to their children?
    • Does this story remind you of any western fairytales?
  • Fewer Koreans Pledge to Donate Organs
    • Have you ever donated blood?
      • How did you make your decision?
    • Why do so few Koreans donate blood or their organs?
    • Would you donate your organs?
    • Korea Times: Father donates organs from brain dead 5-year-old daughter to save children
      • “When I heard from the doctor that So-yul would not be able to live anymore, I thought it would be meaningful if her heart could be donated to save another child’s life rather than being turned into a handful of ashes. As long as the child who received her heart is alive, So-yul’s heart will live on. It gives me a lot of comfort to think that way,” the father said according to KODA.

May 17, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • Students
    • How are your students?
    • Good students and not so good.
      • “sometimes it’s like pulling teeth.”

May 10, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • How was your Parent’s Day?
    • Is it Parent’s Day or Parents’ Day? (What’s the difference?)
    • What did you give?
    • What did you get?
  • Chosun Ilbo – More Young Women Take to Venting Anger Online
    • “Young women are increasingly taking to the Internet to vent their frustrations with the ways of the world.
      …They still make up a small proportion of Korea’s vociferous armchair warriors, but their forces are massing.”
      • vociferous
      • armchair warriors
        • (idiom) “armchair ____”
        • (idiom) “____ warrior”
    • Have you ever vented online?
  • Korea Bizwire – Swimsuit Sales Surge as Gov’t Lifts 2-week Quarantine for Inbound Travelers
    • “Women’s swimsuit sales jumped by 188 percent, with bikini sales up by 248 percent and one-piece beachwear by 46 percent.”
      • Are you surprised?
    • (joke idiom) “pics or it didn’t happen”
    • “Male swimsuit sales have also gone up by 69 percent, with swim trunk sales up by 34 percent and swim briefs by 26 percent.”
      • Are you surprised?
  • Chosun Ilbo – Koreans Grow Gradually Taller
    • Have you noticed? I have.
      • My first day in Korea….
    • When you were growing up, did you think you were tall, above average, average, below average, or short?
      • I used to think of myself as tall, now I feel like I’m above average.

May 3, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • Buzzfeed for Mother’s Day – “I Had Just Never Looked At It That Way Before”: People Are Revealing The Eye-Opening “Tip” Their Mom Gave That Completely Changed Their Life
    • What is your best mothering tip?
    • What is some good advice your mom has given to you?
  • Mother’s Day is celebrated on the second Sunday in May
    • Which do you think is the bigger holiday in the U.S.: Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, or Children’s Day?
    • The American version of Mother’s Day has been criticized for having become too commercialized. Anna Jarvis (who in the early 20th century first suggested a day honoring mothers) herself, who began the celebration as a liturgical observance, regretted this commercialism and expressed that this was never her intention.
    • Internationally, there were immediate concerns surrounding the exclusive association of Mother’s Day with a biological definition of motherhood. Constance Adelaide Smith instead advocated for Mothering Sunday.
    • Traditions vary by country
      • U.S. – Traditions on Mother’s Day include
        • churchgoing
        • giving carnations
          • Carnations have come to represent Mother’s Day since Anna Jarvis delivered 500 of them at the first celebration in 1908. Many religious services held later adopted the custom of giving away carnations. This also started the custom of wearing a carnation on Mother’s Day. The founder, Anna Jarvis, chose the carnation because the carnation her mother’s favorite flower. Due in part to the shortage of white carnations and to the efforts to expand the sales of more types of flowers in Mother’s Day, florists invented the idea of wearing a pink carnation if your mother was living or a white one if she was dead. “This was tirelessly promoted until it made its way into the popular observations at churches.” Other less traditional flower options may include roses, a live blooming plant, flower leis, or a bouquet of a variety of different flowers.
        • family dinners
          • I read that Mother’s Day is the single busiest restaurant day in the U.S.
            • Are you surprised?
            • I was; that is, until I thought about it….
        • Mother’s Day cards
          • Mother’s Day is the third largest holiday in the United States for sending cards. According to the greeting card industry, it is estimated that more than 50 percent of American households send greeting cards on this holiday. The holiday has been heavily commercialized by advertisers and retailers, and has been criticized by some as a Hallmark Holiday.
        • Phone call to mother
          • Mother’s Day is the only time that I got an “all lines are busy. Please hang up the phone and try your call later” recording in the U.S.
        • Commercialization
          • The commercialization of U.S. holidays in general began very early, and only nine years after the first official Mother’s Day, the commercialization had become so rampant that Anna Jarvis herself became a major opponent of what the holiday had become, spending all her inheritance and the rest of her life fighting what she saw as an abuse of the celebration. She decried the practice of purchasing greeting cards, which she saw as a sign of being too lazy to write a personal letter. She was arrested in 1948 for disturbing the peace while protesting against the commercialization of Mother’s Day, and she finally said that she “…wished she would have never started the day because it became so out of control …”
          • “Mother’s Day is now one of the most commercially successful American occasions, having become the most popular day of the year to dine out at a restaurant in the United States and generating a significant portion of the U.S. jewelry industry’s annual revenue, from custom gifts like mother’s rings. Americans spend approximately $2.6 billion on flowers, $1.53 billion on pampering gifts—like spa treatments—and another $68 million on greeting cards.”
        • Children’s Day in America
          • American Child: “Why is there no Children’s Day?”
          • American Parent: “Everyday is Children’s Day in America.”
            (an old joke)
          • “It has been suggested that commercialization has ensured that the holiday has continued, while other holidays from the same time, such as Children’s Day and Temperance Sunday, are no longer celebrated.”

April 26, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • Did you like Lego Land?
    • [Yes | No] I did [not] like Lego Land because _____. For example, ___ ________ _________. Also, ________ __________ ______.
      However, _________________. But on the whole I [liked | did not like] Lego Land.
    • (I think I know what I’m going to do next weekend.)
  • Me last week during Eunseon’s class
    • Have you seen this video?
      • Wait for it…
      • Wait for it…
      • Wait for it…
      • Wait.For.It…
        • I think she’s the greatest comedic actress since Lucille Ball
    • He and his family had their 15 minutes of fame
  • (cont. from April 19, read article) Washington Post (WaPo) via Yahoo: ‘He is not a Joshua’: When you pick the wrong name for your baby
    • Have you ever thought about changing your child’s name?
    • Have you ever thought about changing your name?
    • Have you ever thought of yourself as feeling like a different name?
      • What Korean name do you feel like?
    • You chose an English name. How did you choose your English name?
      • Do you feel like your name?
      • Have you changed your name in the past?
    • From the article: Mark to David

      We named our baby Mark. But we live in Boston, so people called him “Maaak.” When his uncles started calling him “Maaakie,” I couldn’t take it. When he was two months old, he became David. Of course Rhode Islanders call him “Davit,” but it’s better than “Maaakie.”

      – Barbara Fournier, 75, Milton, Massachusetts
      • (Note her age.)
      • The Boston (and New England) accent: The Heat | “Are You A Narc?”
        • “The Heat”
          • What are Korean slang words for police officer?
          • English slang for police officer
            • cop, copper
            • fuzz
            • Johnnie Law
            • lawman
            • flatfoot (colloquial, archaic, pejorative)
            • pig, oinker (derogatory, slang)
            • (U.S.) Five-O, Barney
            • Officer Friendly
    • (Read all the in-article comments:
      • Sean to Kevin
      • Eleanor to Glynnis
      • Joyce to Grace
      • Elizabeth Erin to Erin Elizabeth
      • Francisca to Amelia
      • Joshua to Bryant
      • … )

April 19, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • How was your Easter?
  • How did your Easter class go?
    • (idiom) “how did it go?”
      • Was the class a success or did things work out well?
      • Reply – “It went well” or “it was good”.
        • well vs. good
  • What Easter English vocabulary did you learn and use?
    • Did you find learning these words easier with an anchor and having a use for them?
  • “It was a warm day for a worm”
    • warm … for… a worm
  • photographer
  • Washington Post (WaPo) via Yahoo: ‘He is not a Joshua’: When you pick the wrong name for your baby
    • Have you ever thought about changing your child’s name?
    • Have you ever thought about changing your name?
    • Have you ever thought of yourself as feeling like a different name?
      • What Korean name do you feel like?
    • You chose an English name. How did you choose your English name?
      • Do you feel like your name?
      • Have you changed your name in the past?
    • From the article: Mark to David

      We named our baby Mark. But we live in Boston, so people called him “Maaak.” When his uncles started calling him “Maaakie,” I couldn’t take it. When he was two months old, he became David. Of course Rhode Islanders call him “Davit,” but it’s better than “Maaakie.”

      – Barbara Fournier, 75, Milton, Massachusetts
      • (Note her age.)
      • The Boston (and New England) accent: The Heat | “Are You A Narc?”
        • “The Heat”
          • What are Korean slang words for police officer?
          • English slang for police officer
            • cop, copper
            • fuzz
            • Johnnie Law
            • lawman
            • flatfoot (colloquial, archaic, pejorative)
            • pig, oinker (derogatory, slang)
            • (U.S.) Five-O, Barney
            • Officer Friendly
    • (Read all the in-article comments:
      • Sean to Kevin
      • Eleanor to Glynnis
      • Joyce to Grace
      • Elizabeth Erin to Erin Elizabeth
      • Francisca to Amelia
      • Joshua to Bryant
      • … )

April 12, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • How did your Arbor Day class go?
    • (idiom) “how did it go?”
      • Was the class a success or did things work out well?
      • Reply – “It went well” or “it was good”.
        • well vs. good
  • Holy Week
    • Palm Sunday
    • Holy Thursday / Maundy Thursday
      • The last supper
      • Gethsemane
    • Good Friday
      • Trial before Pontius Pilate
      • What do you do on Good Friday?
      • Is Good Friday a time to celebrate?
    • Holy Saturday
    • Easter Sunday
      • What do you do on Easter Sunday?

The Little Engine That Could

  • Children’s books
    • What do you read to your children?
    • How do you decide which books to buy for them and then to read to them?
    • The Five Chinese Brothers
      • Reception and controversy
        • Though often considered a classic of children’s literature, The Five Chinese Brothers has been accused of promoting ethnic stereotypes about the Chinese, particularly through its illustrations,[1][2][3] and many teachers have removed the book from their classrooms.[4] However, the book has had some defenders. In a 1977 School Library Journal article, Selma G. Lanes described the illustrations as “cheerful and highly appealing”, characterizing Wiese’s “broad cartoon style” as “well suited to the folk-tale, a genre which deals in broad truths”. She added, “I cannot remember a tale during my childhood that gave me a cozier sense of all being right with the world.”
  • Examining The Five Chinese Brothers
    • Complaint #1: everyone in the crowd looks exactly alike in a stereotypical way.
    • Complaint #2: Chinese people are not yellow like that.
    • Complaint #3: Not only the people in the crowd, the other characters all look the same, too.
    • Complaint #4: these people all have the stereotypical slanted eyes.
    • Complaint #5: Bishop didn’t cite a source of this “Chinese” tale.
  • Scholastic.com: Teaching “The Five Chinese Brothers”
  • The Little Engine That Could
  • Reading
    • What are your favorite books for teaching English reading?
    • What do you look for in selecting, choosing, books for your young learners?
      • Moral
      • Idioms and expressions
      • Pictures
      • “Cultural literacy”
    • Which books were you most successful with?
    • Which books were you not so successful with?
      • What makes successful books for teaching successful?
      • What makes unsuccessful books for teaching unsuccessful?
    • Which books were your favorite books when you were a child?
      • Why?
    • Here’s my most memorable book from when I was a child:
      • .
      • “I think I can… I think I can… I think I can….
      • “I thought I could… I thought I could… I thought I could….”
        • Moral lessons: perseverance, self-confidence, belief in one’s self.
      • Story follows a classic five-part story in both structure AND the plot as a metaphor itself
      • I think that if I teach it to young Korean children, EFL learners, I would rewrite, simplify, the story.
        • (Do you see the appositives?)
        • Note that the story is “out of copyright”

April 5, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

Did you pull off an April Fool’s Day prank?

March 29, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

April 1, April Fool’s Day

  • CNN Health: Drinking coffee could benefit your heart and help you live longer, research finds
    • Video: Is coffee good for you? (02:07)
    • “Drinking two to three cups of coffee daily has been associated with a 10% to 15% lower risk of getting heart disease, heart failure or a heart rhythm problem, or dying early for any reason, according to three research abstracts published Thursday.”
      • My January – February: micro resolution: no coffee
        • I now drink 1 -3 cups of coffee per day
        • The “echo” or “halo effect” of my micro resolution.
      • Did you notice any echos or halo effects from your micro resolutions?
      • Do you want to suggest a micro resolution for someone else?
  • Chosun Ilbo – Is Kimchi Going Out of Style
    • In style, in fashion / out of style, out of fashion
      • What do you think “making kimchi like it’s going out of style” means?
        • “If you do something like it’s going out of style or as though it’s going out of style, you do it a lot and with great energy.”
          • I know that is correct, but now that I hear it, it sounds strange.
    • Koreans Eat 36 kg of Kimchi a Year
      • How much kimchi do you think that you eat per year?
      • 36kg /year = 3 kg / month = 100 g / day
      • Do you eat that much kimchi?

March 22, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • First day of Spring
    • the vernal equinox
      • equinox
    • Do you have Spring fever?
  • Reuters (via Yahoo News): Good move? S.Korean president’s home stirs feng shui furore
    • furore –  a sudden excited or angry reaction to something by a lot of people
      •  \ ˈfyu̇r-ˌȯr  , -ər, especially British fyu̇-ˈrȯ-rē \
        • How do you read the pronunciation guides?
    • shortlist – a narrowed down and small field of possible options
      • a candidate on the shortlist
      • a company on the shortlist of vendors
      • “His transition committee conducted on-site surveys on Friday after drawing up a shortlist of two possible locations”
    • feng shui –
      • “Some Democratic Party officials have said other considerations could be in play, and have accused Yoon of being influenced by masters of feng shui, a form of geomancy that originated in China. They have said the Blue House was inauspicious.”
        • geomancy
          • the art of placing or arranging buildings or other sites auspiciously.
          • do you know any geo- words?
        • inauspicious
      • “Jee Jong-hag, head of a major feng shui society, said the Blue House is badly located, which could explain why dozens of ancient kings worked and lived elsewhere. More recently, four out of the six presidents in the country’s 25-year democratic history have been imprisoned or committed suicide after leaving office.”
        • What do you think?
      • Do you know any feng shui practices?
      • Do you follow any feng shui practices?
    • Chosun Ilbo – President to Move out of Historic Cheong Wa Dae
      • “The historic Blue House with its splendid gardens will be opened to the public after Yoon is inaugurated, and the old main hall and staff annex could become a presidential memorial hall and museum.”
        • Have you been to Chung Wa Dae?
        • What did you think?
        • Do you want to take a tour of Chung Wa Dae now that it is open to the public?
      • “…Koreans are right to wonder whether key facilities should be relocated at such short notice with less than two months left before the new president is inaugurated. It is difficult to move even a private home in just two months, and the structure and layout of Cheong Wa Dae are a finely honed machine of workflow based on decades of experience. Ignoring that could have serious side effects. There must also be problems from rudely separating the Joint Chiefs of Staff from the Defense Ministry next door since they both handle the security of the country. There cannot have been enough consideration of these issues. The cost too is likely to be astronomical, and a mere presidential transition team should not be making such a big budgetary decision.
        It is a pity that Yoon did not go through a process of sounding out public opinion on the matter. Perhaps he thought that would end up bogging down the relocation again as it has done so many times in the past. But such huge changes in the name of boosting communication with the public and transparency unfortunately require public consultation. That is how democracy works.”
  • “My Fault as a Father who Failed to Raise His Child Properly” Chang Je-won Steps down from Yoon Seok-youl’s Election Campaign
    • “On September 28, People Power Party lawmaker Chang Je-won apologized for his son, Chang Yong-jun, also known as the rapper Noel, who assaulted a police officer, and said, “I deeply regret my fault as a father who failed to raise his child properly, and I will take time to reflect on myself.” He also announced that he was stepping down as head of former prosecutor general Yoon Seok-youl’s presidential campaign.”

      Chang’s son, Yong-jun was arrested for assaulting a police officer who tried to test him to see if he was drinking and driving on September 18. At the time, the rapper was driving without a license. In 2019, he received a suspended sentence in court for trying to switch the driver after crashing into a motorcycle while driving under the influence.”
    • Would you have resigned?
    • How much responsibility would you feel for your adult son’s behavior?

March 15, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • My no coffee micro-resolution results
    • I started drinking coffee again
    • I drink substantially less coffee, maybe two cups per day, which is down substantially from the 6+ cups before.
    • Yesterday, I didn’t drink any.
  • The Ides of March
    • “Beware the Ides of March”
    • Has anyone ever said this to you?
    • The Romans did not number each day of a month from the first to the last day. Instead, they counted back from three fixed points of the month: the Nones (the 5th or 7th, nine days inclusive before the Ides), the Ides (the 13th for most months, but the 15th in March, May, July, and October), and the Kalends (1st of the following month).
      • The Romans referred to the first day of the following month as the Kalends.
        • Sound familiar?
          • (A spoken way of saying, “Does that sound familiar?”)
      • In modern times, the Ides of March is best known as the date on which Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC. According to the historian Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar on the Ides of March. On his way to the Theatre of Pompey, where he would be assassinated, Caesar passed the seer and joked, “The Ides of March are come”, implying that the prophecy had not been fulfilled, to which the seer replied “But they are not gone.”
      • This meeting was dramatized by Shakespeare in the play Julius Caesar.
        • Now every American high schooler knows “Beware the Ides of March”.
        • I think that this might be the single most quoted of all of Shakespeare’s famous lines.
      • Shakespeare might be rank as most quoted in English only behind the Bible.
        • Do you know any Shakespeare quotes?
          • “To be or not to be….”
          • “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?”
          • “Et tu, Brute”
  • Korea Herald – Final Voter Turnout
    • Did you vote?
    • Are you happy with the results?
  • “By region, Gwangju had the highest turnout, with 81.5 percent, while Jeju had the lowest at 72.6 percent. Seoul’s turnout stands at 77.9 percent. “
    • A matter of style: Do not switch verb tenses.
      • When writing in the past tense, stay in the past tense.
  • Chosun – Private Education Spending Hits Record in Pandemic
    • So how’s business?
    • “According to a poll of some 74,000 students from 3,000 primary and secondary schools across the country by the Education Ministry, parents spent a monthly average of W367,000 on private education, up a whopping 21.5 percent from the year before (US$1=W1,232). The total was W23.4 trillion.”
    • “Spending for elementary schoolkids increased dramatically at 39.4 percent, compared to 14.6 percent for middle schoolers and six percent for high schoolers.”
      • Are you surprised?
      • Why did they poll students?
        • Do you think the students know how much parents spent better than the parents?
        • Do you think the students might lie?
        • Do you think the parents would lie?
        • Why not ask the parents?
      • How much do you spend for private education?
    • Lockdown Fuels Private Tutoring Boom
      • What do you think boom means?
      • idioms: boom and bust
        • dot-com boom followed by the dot-com bust.
        • bust is used in a similar sense for disappointment: “The new West Side Story was a bust”, but we wouldn’t say “The new Spiderman movie was a boom.”

March 8, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • Korea Times – So long YOLO, young Koreans choose ‘Godsaeng’
    • YOLO
    • Do you know about Godsaeng?
      • “lead an industrious and active life”
      • “Godsaeng” ― a portmanteau of “God” and “saeng” (which means “life” in Korean)
    • ‘Jung Hye-in, a 32-year-old office worker in Seoul, takes dietary supplements with warm water, does a few yoga poses and reads at least one economic report every morning before starting work. During lunchtime, she takes a TOEFL class or goes for a 30-minute walk. Before going to sleep, she writes a blog about her daily life and her interest in fashion, home decoration, music and books.

      “I’m naturally a planner, but I started keeping track of my habits more precisely after moving out of my parents’ house in 2020. Setting a goal and diligently working toward achieving it is meaningful and fulfilling,” [Jung] said. Like

      Jung, an increasing number of young people in Korea are adopting simple and healthy habits ― things like keeping a tidy and organized living space, drinking 2 liters of water per day, and cutting down on screen time.

      …However, that doesn’t mean they follow grandiose plans. Rather, they find meaning in completing day-to-day tasks.

      “The stress of constant rejection in the job market and making social comparisons have led young people to look for small moments of happiness. Instead of setting big, long-term goals, they set a series of small objectives that seem attainable and measurable,” she said.

      Asked how Godsaeng differs from the “YOLO” (an acronym for “you only live once”) trend, which refers to a lifestyle that encourages people to cherish the present moment without worrying too much about the future, the professor explained that Godsaeng is more pragmatic.

      “For some reason, YOLO has found negative connotations in Korea. The term was used to represent young people who abandon their stable jobs to discover what they really want and to splurge on experience. By contrast, ‘Godsaeng-ers’ believe their small endeavors will build up and help them to create greater achievements in the future. They’ve grown wiser,” Kwak said.

      “While the trend has been somewhat exploited by companies, it is true that it has been accepted by many Koreans as a cultural code of living in the present,” Kwak at Seoul National University said.
      However, Lee warned that excessive pursuits of such productivity can have a negative impact.

      “The people who engage in a Godsaeng lifestyle are often high-achievers. I have observed that these individuals push themselves too far and experience burnout,” she said.

      The psychiatrist stressed that we should tell ourselves that it’s okay not to achieve self-improvement every day or to fail to achieve our goals sometimes.

      “Please be more generous with yourself,” she said.’
  • The best foods for a good night’s sleep
    • How well do you sleep at night?
    • How much sleep do you need?
      • How much sleep do you get?
      • How much sleep do you want?
    • What time do you usually wake up?
      • Do you need an alarm or do you wake up on your own?
    • What time do you usually go to bed?
      • How regular are you about your bedtimes?
    • How often do you take naps?
      • adverbs of frequency: always, almost always, usually, often, sometimes, occasionally, rarely, hardly ever, almost never, never
    • What do you do when you can’t sleep?
      • PREP or OREO
    • Can’t sleep? Here are the best foods and drinks to incorporate into your diet
      1. Almonds
      2. Walnuts
      3. Bananas
      4. Tart Cherries or Cherry Juice
      5. Chamomile and Lavender Tea 
      6. Oats
      7. Salmon
      8. Eggs
      9. Avocado
      10. Kiwis
        • How many of these do you eat regularly?
  • Chosun Ilbo: Korea Becomes Largest Buyer of U.S. Beef
    • Korea became the biggest importer of U.S. beef last year.
      • Are you surprised?
    • “The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) said on Sunday that Korea imported 253,175 tons of American beef from January to November last year, up 16 percent on-year. In value terms, imports increased 39 percent on-year to US$2.14 billion. Japan, which was the previous top importer of U.S. beef, imported 238,811 tons during the first 11 months of last year, slightly fewer than Korea’s.”
      • “fewer” or “less”
        • What’s the difference?
        • The difference is the same as between “number” and “amount”
          • In practicality, is there a difference?
        • Which is correct in this context?
          • Depends
          • If someone uses “fewer” what is he really saying?
          • If another uses “less” what is she really saying?
        • What would I have written?
      • “The USMEF said, ‘Japan will finish 2021 as the leading volume destination for U.S. beef exports, but is in a neck-and-neck race with [Korea] on export value.’ “
        • idiom: “is neck-and neck with” or “is running neck-and-neck with” or in a neck-and-neck race with”
        • What does “running neck-and-neck with” mean?
        • Where does it come from?
        • Other idioms:
          • “coming into the homestretch”
            • this is one of my favorites
          • The Week: 10 of our favorite phrases that come from horse racing
          • Horse racing magazine: Horse Racing Idioms a Part of U.S. Culture
            • to spur
            • to reign-in
            • “hold your horses”
              • “don’t be so aggressive”
              • often said to children and might be a little rude to say to another adult outside of a joking or friendly context
          • Owlcation: 25 Horse Sayings, Expressions, and Idioms Explained
            • Trojan horse
            • Get Off Your High Horse
            • Horse Sense
              • The type of common sense one might have from rugged, practical experience rather than education; practical wisdom
            • Horseplay
            • Put the Cart Before the Horse
              1. Do things in the wrong order or sequence
              2. Logical fallacies of confusing effect for cause or premise for conclusion
            • Stalking Horse
              1. a false pretext concealing someone’s real intentions.
              2. (literal) a screen traditionally made in the shape of a horse behind which a hunter can stay concealed when stalking prey.
            • Don’t Spare the Horses
              • make haste, go fast
              • from using a riding crop (whip) to make the horses run faster
            • One-Horse Town
              • a small town with nothing to do
              • (I think of Anseong as a one-horse town.)
            • Dark Horse
              • Someone who unexpectedly comes to prominence in a field, often used in politics
              • Bill Clinton was a dark horse candidate in 1992
            • Gone the Way of the Horse and Buggy
              • typewriters, upon adaptation of word processors
                • In 1987, Smith-Corona was profitable; in 1988, Smith-Corona went bankrupt
              • literally, the horse and buggy on the introduction of the automobile
            • “If Wishes Were Horses, Beggars Would Ride”
              • One of many ways to say “woulda, coulda, shoulda”
              • One of my favorites: “If ‘ifs’ and ‘buts’ were cherries and nuts, we’d all have a Merry Christmas”
        • List of sports idioms
          • “This list does not include idioms derived exclusively from baseball. The body of idioms derived from that sport is so extensive that two other articles are exclusively dedicated to them. See English language idioms derived from baseball and baseball metaphors for sex.” (lol)
          • Many general (American) English and business English idioms come from baseball, boxing, horse racing, golf, and fishing and hunting.

March 1, 2022 (Independence Day)

(No class)

February 22, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • Today is Tuesday, February 22, 2022
    • Happy Twos-day!
    • (I suppose this joke only works in English, but you should see whether your students get it.)

Staples – Back To School The Most Wonderful Time Of The Year

  • Self-improvement: CNN article – My ‘dry’ January: What I learned from a month without social media
    • dry
      • dry (literally)
      • dry (figuratively)
      • dry spell
        • a “spell” in this context means “an arbitrary, though definite, length of time”.
    • Do you remember micro-resolutions?
    • Do you have enough time in the week?
      • What do you do to save time?
      • What are your time wasters?
  • Korea Bizwire – Hyundai Grandeur Bestselling Car in S. Korea Over Last Decade
    • “CarIsYou Data Research Center reported that there were 1,010,681 units of Hyundai Grandeur registered between Jan. 2012 and Dec. 2021, making it the country’s bestselling domestic car.”
    • “The Grandeur was followed by Hyundai’s Avante compact car (876,842 units), Sonata sedan (872,546 units), Santa Fe SUV (738,815 units) and Kia Corp’s Morning minicar (698,869 units).”
    • “The bestselling imported car was the Mercedes-Benz E-Class sedan (251,060 cars), followed by BMW’s 5-series (194,334 cars) and 3-series sedans (86,717 units) and the Audi A6 sedan (84,517 units).”
      • Are you surprised?
      • What will be your next car?
  • Business Korea – Lotte World Tower Offers Program to Walk on Bridge at Highest Altitude in World
    • “Sky Bridge Tour at 541 Meters above the Ground”
    • Do you have acrophobia, a fear of heights?
      • What is acrophobia?
        • acro + phobia
        • phobia means “fear of” and is one of the most used suffixes in English.
          • We can even create custom phobias by adding phobia to the end of any word.
            • We even have a word for fear of clowns, coulrophobia (COOl-ruh-FOE-bee-uh).
            • I know a few people, including my cousin, who have a fear of clowns.
            • “Which clowns, circus clowns or hobo clowns, do you think are scarier?”
            • “Hobo clowns. …because they’re hungry.”
        • Would you want to do this?
          • I suppose that we can answer an economist’s question, “at what price?”

February 15, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

Pasta

  • CNN Podcast – Dr. Sanjay Gupta: This Is Your Brain on Love (start at 3:00)
    • (For Valentine’s Day) Love is in the air… but today we’re talking neurochemicals, not roses! CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta explores the brain science behind falling in love and the surprising similarities to addiction. Plus, expert tips on how to keep love alive during the pandemic, and one therapist’s secret to healthy relationships.
  • Here’s a great one: The Science of Grit 
    • What makes a ballerina, a world-class chef, or a civic activist great? Psychologist Angela Duckworth says the answer is GRIT — a power combo of passion and perseverance. Angela teaches us how to become the grittiest versions of ourselves, and gives us valuable advice on when to quit and when to grit.

February 8, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

Happy Seollal and thank you

  • Have you been watching the Olympics?
    • What verb tense is have been watching?
  • BBC News: Chinese New Year: What is it and how is it celebrated?
    • “Chinese New Year”
      • That’s what I knew the lunar new year as in less politically correct times
        • politically correct
    • “Celebrations begin with the rising of the second new moon after the winter solstice (21 December). This can occur on any date between 21 January and 20 February.”
    • In western culture, we have only one lunar holiday, Easter
    • “This year is the Year of the Tiger. It is said that children born in the year ahead will be brave, competitive and strong.”
      • Do you know your birth animal?
        • Do you notice anything about these?
      • In the west we have astrological signs
  • “Korea Herald – Can the Korean language survive the invasion of English loanwords?
  • What are loanwords?
    • A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word as permanently adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation.
  • “When a new English loanword is adopted into Korean, the Korean speaker who adopted it had to get it from somewhere, which means they had to have consumed some media or had some contact with an English speaker. So you’re only going to get loanwords from a language when enough people are engaging with the language in some form.”
    • Is this good?
  • Loanwords in English
  • JoongAng Daily – Coffee cup surcharge faces backlash from shop owners
    • “The measure is intended to tackle Korea’s single-use plastic problem. The ministry estimates that franchise stores use 2.3 billion single-use plastic or paper cups a year, which is around 44 cups per person. Paper cups generally come with plastic lids.”
      • [Does | Do] 44 cups per person surprise you?
        • Which is it? Why?
      • How many single-use plastic or paper cups do you use per year?
        • Are you sure?
        • Think again.
    • “But the Environment Ministry maintains that the backlash is based on misunderstanding of the rules. Despite store owners’ worries, they won’t actually be required to pay the 300 won refund if a customer returns a cup to their store. “
      • backlash
    • “Instead, the cup will be tracked through a barcode that can be scanned when the cup is returned, and the store where they purchased it will fork out the 300 won.”
      • fork over
        • really more of a spoken than a written idiom

February 1, 2022 (Tuesday, Seollal)

No Class

January 25, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • Graphic News – Pandemic stress weighs heavily on Gen Z
    • “Isolation. Anxiety. Uncertainty.”
      • Isolation – isola + tion
      • isolate – isola + ate
    • “The stresses of the coronavirus pandemic have taken a toll on Americans of all ages, but a new poll finds that teens and young adults have faced some of the heaviest struggles as they come of age during a time of extreme turmoil.”
  • Yahoo News: Why is it ‘selfish’ to have kids late — or not at all?
    • The Pope made news with a controversial statement, calling people who choose not to have children “selfish”.
      • Speaking at the Vatican, the pontiff decried the “form of selfishness” of those who “do not want to have children, or just one and no more.” In remarks translated in multiple outlets, he also singled out childfree pet owners, saying, “dogs and cats take the place of children.”
    • From the comments:
      • Alicia: “Pot, meet Kettle. Also there’s this thing about glass houses? The Pope and his priests aren’t supposed to have children, either. I respect people more who don’t have children. There are way too many people out there breeding indiscriminately, so I applaud the ones who have the sense not to.”
        • “Pot, meet Kettle”
          • From the idiom “(that’s like) the pot calling the kettle black”
            • Is the idiom racist?
        • “there’s this thing about glass houses” –
          • “you shouldn’t throw stones if you live in a glass house”
          • “people who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones”
            • In a way, the glass houses idiom is a generalization of the pot and kettle idiom
          • Are the following glass houses or pot, meet kettle?
      • D: “The people with children are the selfish ones. They pay FAR LESS in income taxes than their peers without kids, pay the same in property taxes, pay FAR LESS in state income taxes yet use FAR MORE in services. In fact, outside of criminals there is no demographic even close to being as expensive (not counting those who have issues through no fault of their own) as high birth rate, low income people. In fact the average couple with 3 kids is unlikely to ever pay enough in taxes in their entire lifetime to not be a financial burden to childless people.”
        • What do you think?
      • musicboxqueen: “I think the Pope doesn’t realize that some of us grew up in hideously dysfunctional families and have come away from them with severe mental health issues. People pretty much repeat what they grew up with. I could not, in good conscience, bring a child into a situation like I grew up in. He can call me selfish all he wants, I can hardly take care of myself, much less a child.”
      • Chris: “Just what exactly makes a pope so high and mighty?”
        • lol ㅋㅋㅋ
        • “high and mighty” = “get off your high horse”
      • Jennifer: “I’d like to know how the choice TO have kids isn’t considered selfish. There isn’t a single reason to have a child that isn’t selfish.”
        • Does she have a point?
        • Is there a single reason o have a child that isn’t selfish?
      • Marian: “There are many young people who are not having children because of their legitimate concerns about the climate crisis!”
        • Ben: “I think it’s selfish TO have kids. Earth is overpopulated as it is.”
      • Mike: “Or you can look at it this way. Those who refuse to have kids will just have their evolutionary lines die off and life will go on for the rest”
      • Katharine: “Let me add another perspective, from a child born to a couple late in life. My mother was 34 and my father was 43 when I was born. It was not because they waited deliberately but I was an opps. My father died unexpectedly when I was 10. Life was hard after that and even now that my mother is 79 and I am 45 I am concerned about what will happen when she passes. Waiting to have kids until you are in your 30’s-50’s is selfish on the parents part. You don’t know what life will bring EVER but you know do know that certain events are more likely later in life. If you are waiting until 40’s to have a child you are selfish and only thinking about yourself not what the child will go through. I hope that those people never experience anything bad but I think the last few years have taught us what we plan and what happens in the world probably will not match up. I understand the financial reasons to wait but late 20’s is late enough. Mid-30’s, 40’s, and 50’s is just too late. We need to have talks about what we can do medically versus what should be done in all stages of life.”
        • Does she have a point?
        • I have my concerns with my young children
    • What do you think?
      • What do you think about this in the context of Korea’s LBR and as a Korean?
      • I had a friend who thought that the only reason to get married (as opposed to just live together or be in a LTR) was to have children.
        • Do you agree or disagree that marriage makes sense only in the context of having children?

January 18, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • CNN: Your guide to creating a capsule wardrobe for work
    • What is a capsule wardrobe?
      • “If you’re even tangentially interested in fashion, you’ve probably heard of what’s called a capsule wardrobe. At its most basic definition, a capsule wardrobe is an interchangeable set of basic wardrobe staples that you can mix and match to create an (almost) endless supply of outfits. The benefit, of course, is that you have a preselected batch of outfits to choose from, which makes getting ready for work in the morning a cinch. (You’re also less likely to impulse shop if you can’t figure out more than a handful of ways to incorporate it into your existing capsule wardrobe.)”
      • “A capsule wardrobe forces you to think more purposefully about your personal style. Choose pieces that not only make getting dressed easier but better reflect what fashion and dressing up means to you.”
      • But how do you start to build a capsule wardrobe for work? Well, you start with the basics.
      • Capsule wardrobe essentials for women
      • Capsule wardrobe essentials for men

January 11, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • Snow
  • Jejudo
  • Dong-a Ilbo – Half-Korean U.S. woman becomes first Miss America
    • “Emma Broyles became the first Korean woman who was crowned Miss America since the pageant contest started in 1921. Representing Alaska, Broyles, a third-generation daughter of a Korean family living in the United States…”
      • Third generation
        • History of American immigration has been that people usually “drop the hyphen” after the second generation.
  • New Miss America first Alaskan, Korean American title holder
    • Korean-American crowned Miss America

January 4, 2022 (Tuesday, 9:50)

  • January 6 – Epiphany: the twelfth day of Christmas
    • Date of birth of Jesus
    • “The date of birth of Jesus is not stated in the gospels or in any historical reference, but most biblical scholars assume a year of birth between 6 and 4 BC.”
    • Why not year zero?
    • Ok, why not year 1 A.D.
      • A.D. – Anno Domini
        • “after death”
      • BC – Before Christ
    • OK, so why 6 BC – 4 BC?
      • “Matthew 2:1 – “Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king”.
      • Matthew also implies that Jesus could have been as much as two years old at the time of the visit of the Magi because Herod ordered the murder of all boys up to the age of two years, “in accordance with the time he had learned from the Magi”.
        • Known as the slaughter of the innocents or massacre of the innocents
      • Historians are certain of the reign and death of Herod, who died in 4 BC.
    • Why not December 25?
  • Singles in their 20s and 30s Want Civil Servant Spouses
    • According to a survey conducted by local matchmaking agency Gayeon of 500 single men and 500 single women between the ages of 25 and 39, 31.7 percent of the respondents picked ‘civil servant or government employee’ as the ideal occupation for their spouse.

      The top occupation favored by single men was ‘civil servant or government employee,’ followed by ‘office worker’ and ‘professional worker.’

      Single women picked ‘civil servant or government employee’ as the most favored occupation, followed by ‘professional worker’ and ‘office worker.’ In last year’s survey, single men and women both favored ‘professional worker.’

      Both single men and women picked ‘personality and values’ as the foremost condition for their spouses.

      For single men, ‘personality and values’ ranked first at 89.2 percent, followed by ‘physical appearance’ at 53 percent, ‘age’ at 31 percent and ‘occupation’ at 21.2 percent.

      For single women, ‘personality and values’ topped the list at 89.4 percent, followed by ‘income’ at 40.6 percent, ‘occupation’ at 32.2 percent and ‘physical appearance’ at 28.8 percent.

      As for the annual salary of spouses, single men favored the 30-60 million won (US$25,270-50,550) level (70.8 percent), while single women favored the 60-100 million won level (44.4 percent).
    • Are you surprised?
      • For single men,
        1. ‘personality and values’
        2. ‘physical appearance’
        3. ‘age’
      • For single women,
        1. ‘personality and values’
        2. ‘income’
        3. ‘occupation’
        4. ‘physical appearance’
    • How about you?
      • What would you look for?

December 28, 2021 (Tuesday, 9:30)

Thank you

December 23, 2021 (Thursday, 9:30)

메리 크리스마스 – Merry Christmas
  • Anseong Tuntun “Christmas Big Party” vs “Big Christmas Party

    • Which is it?
    • Who’s the hardest working girl in show business?
    • What did you think?

Merry Creepy Christmas

Elf on a Shelf – Friend or foe?

December 21, 2021 (Tuesday, 9:30)

Class rescheduled to Dec. 23, 9:30

December 14, 2021 (Tuesday, 9:30)

  • Korea Herald: Friend for hire
    • A Korea Herald reporter takes the job of pretending to be one’s friend at a wedding

December 7, 2021 (Tuesday, 9:30)

  • nearsighted and farsighted
    • literally and figuratively
    • shortsighted (always figuratively)
  • Left vs right
    • gauche, dexterous
    • sinister
  • Note the pronoun problems in the original “The Giving Tree” essay. I lean toward writing with nouns for two reasons:
    1. Pronouns are cloudy; nouns put more pictures in readers’ minds
    2. Pronouns can be ambiguous:
      • “…he tells him that he is happy” has four reasonable interpretations:
        1. The boy tells the tree that the boy is happy.
        2. The boy tells the tree that the tree is happy.
        3. The tree tells the boy that the boy is happy.
        4. The tree tells the boy that the tree is happy.
  • Korea Herald: Friend for hire
    • A Korea Herald reporter takes the job of pretending to be one’s friend at a wedding

November 30, 2021 (Tuesday, 9:30)

  • Matthew 6:33 – But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these. things shall be added unto you.
  • English idiom: seek and ye shall find
  • Me: you find what you’re looking for

The Giving Tree

“I read a book called The Giving Tree. In this book, when a boy comes to the tree, the tree wants the boy to play with him like before, but the boy wants a part of the tree. The tree gives the boy a part of himself and he tells him that he is happy. I was impressed with this part. Because he couldn’t play with the boy he wanted, but it was impressive that he was happy to help the boy. As I read this book, I felt that I should repay someone like a tree and not become a person like a boy.”

I read a book called “The Giving Tree”. In this book, when a boy comes to the tree, the tree wants the boy to play with the boy like they had played before, but the boy wants a part of the tree. The tree gives the boy a part of himself, and the tree tells the boy that the tree is happy.

I was impressed by this part because the tree couldn’t play with the boy as the tree had wanted, but I found impressive that the tree was happy to help the boy.

As I read this book, I felt that I should repay someone like the tree and not become a person like the boy.

  • Note the pronoun problems in the original. I lean toward writing with nouns for two reasons:
    1. Pronouns are cloudy; nouns put more pictures in readers’ minds
    2. Pronouns can be ambiguous:
      • “…he tells him that he is happy” has four reasonable interpretations:
        1. The boy tells the tree that the boy is happy.
        2. The boy tells the tree that the tree is happy.
        3. The tree tells the boy that the boy is happy.
        4. The tree tells the boy that the tree is happy.
  • Chosun Ilbo – Koreans Most Materialistic in Global Survey
    • materialistic, materialism
    • Are you surprised?
    • “Answers were divided in 19 categories ranging from material well-being to health and family.

      In Korea, material well-being topped the list with 19 percent, followed by health (17 percent), family (16 percent), general satisfaction (12 percent), society (five percent) and freedom (five percent).

      Overall respondents valued family most with 38 percent, followed by work (25 percent) and material well-being (19 percent).

      Most Koreans also cited only a single source of value in life with a whopping 62 percent, while globally only 34 percent did so.

      But surprisingly, work ranked quite low on the list in Korea. It ranked within the top three in most of the 17 countries, but came in seventh place here. It topped the list along with family in Italy, and came second in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Greece, New Zealand, Singapore and Sweden.”
    • Chosun Ilbo (Feb. 24, 2010): Koreans Most Materialistic People in the World
    • (Here’s a fuller account) Korea Expose: What Makes Life Meaningful in Korea? Not Much, It Seems

November 23, 2021 (Tuesday, 9:30)

  • Apartment buildings
    • forms of ownership
      • condominium
        • ownership of a horizontal piece of airspace
      • rent / rental / lease
    • Apartment complex
      • buildings and units
      • common space
    • Difference between Patio, Balcony, Deck, Porch and Veranda
      • a veranda is a covered structure located on the ground level of the house. It is usually attached to two or more sides of the main building.
      • a balcony is an elevated platform affixed to a given room on the upper floor of the building. It is a small structure that juts out of the walls, overlooking the ground-level structures.
      • A porch is attached to the front of the main structure and is considered an informal extension of the house.
      • a patio may either be attached or detached to the main building. Patios are also usually bigger than porches along with more versatile in terms of functionality and aesthetics.
    • foyer – an entrance hall or other open area in a building used by the public, especially a hotel or theater.
  • Baby Girls to Outnumber Boys Soon
    • Outnumber
    • “Indeed, there now seems to be a slight preference for girl children.”
      • Did you have a preference for a son or a daughter?
      • Why did Korean culture have a preference for boys?

Happy (American) Thanksgiving!

November 16, 2021 (Tuesday, 10:30)

Field Trip to apartment buildings

November 11, 2021 (Thursday)

  • Happy Peppero Day!
    • I admire the brilliant marketing
    • Valentine’s Day
  • Chosun – Rainstorms End Warm Autumn Weather
    • “Everyone complains about the weather, but no one seems to do anything about it.” ~ Mark Twain…except it’s not Mark Twain
      • If it’s smart and funny, we think Mark Twain said it.
      • If it’s smart and wise, we think Benjamin Franklin said it.
      • If it’s smart and profound, we think Albert Einstein said it.
    • What are some Korean sayings about the weather?
    • Weather is such an important part of agricultural cultures. What are some remnants, remainders, of weather in present day Korean culture?

November 9, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • Class moved to Thursday for this week.

November 2, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • Blinkist: Help Me!
    • “First, she realized that all the time she’d been reading self-help books, she’d never acted on the advice they gave her. This, she thought, was why her life hadn’t changed. Then the second lightbulb went on: if she started doing self-help instead of simply reading it, then she wouldn’t be unhappy. Far from it – she’d be perfect! 

      And so Marianne decided to read one self-help book a month for a year and implement everything she learned.”
    • My favorite – how she faced her fears
      • My November resolution – rejection:

        “When was the last time you went out looking for rejection? Chances are, it’s never crossed your mind to do this. In fact, you’re probably wondering why anyone would do such a thing.

        But, as Marianne learned from the book Rejection Therapy, if you keep facing rejection, you become desensitized to it. You stop seeing it as something to avoid. As a result, you become more willing to try new things.

        With this in mind, Marianne aimed for one rejection a day. But just as she was gearing up for a rejection that terrified her, something stopped her in her tracks.

        The key message here is: A family tragedy made Marianne question her entire project, but seeking rejection led to significant wins.

        …Weeks later, she came across a quote: “Comfort is highly overrated for individuals who want to progress in life.” And just like that, she was back in the rejection game.

        Except rejection wasn’t all she got. There were unexpected yeses, too. A musician let her play his instrument, and a group of women welcomed her into their conversation. These interactions made her feel like the world was full of possibilities. But then her sister pointed out that Marianne wasn’t trying to do things that could actually change her life.

        As much as she didn’t want to admit it, Marianne knew this was true. And so she took things up a few notches. She pitched articles to publications she wanted to write for and approached a man she’d been admiring in a coffee shop. 

        The results were completely unexpected. One of her pitches turned into a weekly column. And the man in the coffee shop? He immediately asked her on a date. These rewarding attempts at rejection taught Marianne that she’d been playing it safe in far too many areas of her life.”
  • November micro-resolutions
    • Amy
    • Carrie
    • Dana
    • Joseph – rejection.
      • I will practice getting rejected once per day.
    • Sunny
  • (Yonhap Feature) Buycotts as ‘good influence’ gain traction in S. Korea
    • buycott vs. boycott
    • “In support of the county’s decision…, people flocked to the county-run online market to buy Jincheon regional specialties, such as rice, other grains and fruit.”
    • “With the purchase orders pouring in, the officials had to shut down the website for a few days in order to process the deliveries. According to the county, the sales for four days surged to an amount surpassing its monthly average.”
    • “Efforts to spend money for an individual or entity in support of their right choices or ethical deeds are gathering steam in South Korea, amid a growing consumer trend that seeks to find value and meaning in purchases.”
    • Have you ever boycotted or buycotted?
      • Is there anything or any company that you would never buy from?
      • Is there anything you support even though it costs more?

October 26, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • Halloween
    • Why is Halloween called “Halloween”?
      • All words have histories and even reasons.
      • Marathon
      • So, why is Halloween called “Halloween”?
  • JoongAng Daily – Return to Normal Not Celebrated by Everyone
  • “Some younger workers like life under the rules established for the pandemic. “
  • Are you surprised?
  • Why do you think that “some younger workers” prefer life under the new rules?
  • How about you?
    • How about….” vs. “What about ….”
  • State Mint Mulls Other Businesses as Cash Use Dwindles
    • Dwindle
    • Do you still purchase goods and services with cash?
      • What do you (almost) always use your credit card to purchase?
      • What do you sometimes use cash to purchase?
  • When is it okay to lie?
    • (review) scenarios 1-5
    • scenarios 6-10
    • How would you rate the scenarios from 1 (“no brainer” lie) to 10 (misgivings or wouldn’t do it)?
      • Which was your easiest lying scenario?
      • Which was your most difficult?
  • Three reasons you don’t have good style
    • Do you have good style?
    • What is your style?
    • What is your best style tip, your best “do”
    • What is your best style “don’t”?
    • 3 reasons you don’t have anything to wear and how to solve it
      1. Buy fewer trendy and statement pieces
        • 80% basics / 20% trendy
      2. Your basics need to anchor your wardrobe
        • What is an “anchor”?
        • Dress with basics but pepper with trendy
      3. Get shoes that are both stylish and comfortable
        • “Don’t underestimate sneakers”
        • How many pairs of shoes do you own?

October 19, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • The Monkey’s Paw (Text)
    • The Simpson’s Treehouse of Horrors – The Monkey’s Paw
      • satire vs homage (pronounced oh-mahj)
  • Chosun – More Koreans Take Diet Pills to Beat Lockdown Flab
    • Have you gained weight during the coronavirus lockdown?
      • I’ve gained about 2 kg.
      • If you’ve gained weight, do you think that your weight gain is because of the lack of activity due to the coronavirus lockdown?
        • If you haven’t gained weight, how have you maintained your weight?
    • “Data from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety shows the per-capita time people took prescription diet pills rose from 81.8 days in the second half of 2018 to 112.3 days in 2020.”
    • “As more people turned to diet pills, supplies of drugs such as phentermine, phendimetrazine and phentermine/topiramate rose from 241.3 million pills in 2018 to 256.7 million.”
    • “Cases of side effects reported to the Korea Institute of Drug Safety and Risk Management surged from 1,399 cases in 2019 to 1,523 last year. Diet pills are essentially caffeine or speed, so they overstimulate the nervous system to work off calories, causing heart palpitations and increased blood pressure.”
    • Have you ever taken diet pills?
      • Would you take diet pills?

October 12, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • The Monkey’s Paw (Text)
    • The Simpson’s Treehouse of Horrors – The Monkey’s Paw
      • satire vs homage (pronounced oh-mahj)
  • Peak leaves season
  • Air Quality Best on Record in September
    • Idiom: “on record”
    • Idiom: “on the record” vs. “off the record”
    • Have you noticed better air quality recently?
    • “The air quality in the Seoul area was at the best on record in September partly thanks to reduced operation of coal-fired power plants in China.”

October 5, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • ‘Squid Game’ All the Rage in Paris
    • Idiom: “all the rage”
      • ” ‘Gangnam Syle’ was all the rage in 2012″
    • Is “Squid Game” all the rage with TunTun’s teachers?
    • Do you feel like you’re missing out on a pop culture moment?
  • S. Koreans to get cash back on card spending in latest COVID-19 relief fund
    • “From October to the last day of this November, those who spend more than usual will get a sliver of their card spending added back to their bank accounts.

      The Finance Ministry announced on Monday that anybody in South Korea who spends at least three percent more than their average monthly spending in the second quarter, will get ten percent of their extra expenses back, up to a maximum of (W100,000).”
    • Can you, discussing among yourselves in English (or maybe falling back into a little Korean), figure out what this means and how this would work?
    • Will this affect your spending?
    • Will you be able to benefit from this?
  • Men Prefer BMWs, Women Mercedes
    • Are you surprised?
    • Which do you prefer?
    • Why do you think that men would prefer BMWs, and women would prefer Mercedes?
    • How did you decide to buy your car?
    • What options do you want in a car?
    • What are necessities that you need in your car?

September 28, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • Chuseok, 2021
    • Do you have a post-Chuseok letdown?
    • Are you glad or sad it’s over?
  • What would you do? How do you decide?
  • When does TunTun camp season begin?
    • Do you have plans?
    • Do you have stress over them?
  • September micro-resolutions
    • How did your September micro-resolutions go?
      • I was moderately, doing so on about 20 nights, successful with going to bed at 11 pm.
      • The beauty of micro-resolutions
        • yearly resolutions are too hard
      • Monday reset
        • ““The best time to plant a fruit tree was seven years ago. The second best time is now.”
    • October resolutions
      • Amy -> walking 10 mins
      • Dana -> walking 10 mins
      • Grace -> plank 2 mins + stretching
      • Sunny -> stretching 10 mins
      • Carrie -> read to children
      • Joseph -> stretch for 5 mins / day

September 23, 2021 (Thursday, 9:00 a.m.)

(Reschedule / make up for September 7)

Thank you

  • Cross vs. crucifix
    • theological difference
    • symbolism

September 14, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • Do you remember P.R.E.P.?
  • One has to go….
    • What if you could only live in one?
  • September micro-resolutions
    • How did your July micro-resolutions go?
      • The beauty of micro-resolutions
        • yearly resolutions are too hard
      • Monday reset
        • ““The best time to plant a fruit tree was seven years ago. The second best time is now.”
    • September resolutions
      • Amy ->
      • Evelyn ->
      • Dana ->
      • Grace ->
      • Sunny ->
      • Carrie ->
      • Joseph -> go to bed (as a family) by 11:00

September 7, 2021 (Tuesday)

No class – make up September 23

August 31, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • When is it okay to lie?
    • (review) scenarios 1-5
    • scenarios 6-10
    • How would you rate the scenarios from 1 (“no brainer” lie) to 10 (misgivings or wouldn’t do it)?

August 24, 2021 (Tuesday)

August 17, 2021 (Tuesday)

  • Favorite Bible Verses
    • Sunny
      • 1 John 3:16 – “This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters.”
    • Jenny
    • Carrie
      • Thessalonians 5: 10
      • He died for us so that, whether we are awake or asleep, we may live together with him.
  • Amy
    • Dana
    • Evelyn
    • Joseph
      • John 11:35 – “Jesus wept”
        • Context – This verse occurs in John’s narrative of the death of Lazarus of Bethany, a follower of Jesus. Lazarus’s sisters—Mary and Martha—sent word to Jesus of their brother’s illness and impending death, but Jesus arrived four days after Lazarus died. Jesus, after talking to the grieving sisters and seeing Lazarus’s friends weeping, was deeply troubled and moved. After asking where Lazarus had been laid, and being invited to come see, Jesus wept. He then went to the tomb and told the people to remove the stone covering it, prayed aloud to his Father, and ordered Lazarus to come out.
        • the shortest verse in the King James Version of the Bible, as well as many other versions.
          • (It is not the shortest in the original languages.)
        • Interpretation
          • Emphasizes
            • 1) Jesus was a true man with real bodily functions (such as tears, sweat, blood, eating and drinking—note, for comparison, the emphasis laid on Jesus’ eating during the post-resurrection appearances),
            • 2) The nature of Christ as 100% God and 100% human.
  • Koreans Believe Kids Will Be Worse off Than Their Parents
    • worse off , better off
    • “pessimistic”
    • pessimistic vs optimistic
      • Are you pessimistic about whether your kids will be better off than you are?
      • Do you think that each generation should do better than the previous?
      • Do you know any super successful people?
    • In general, are you a pessimist or optimist?
    • Are you a morning person or night person?
    • Are you an introvert or an extrovert?
  • Koreans Believe Success a Matter of Sheer Luck
    • sheer luck
    • Do you think that sheer luck happens or everything is part of a plan?
    • Are some people luckier than others?
    • Can people take action to increase their luck?
    • I remember hearing this quote, which coaches teach kids in sports:

August 10, 2021 (Tuesday)

July 27, 2021 (12:10 pm start)

  • Global Audio Book: The Tiger Brother
    • Do you know this story?
    • Is this story well known in Korean culture?
    • Do Korean parents tell this story to their children?
    • Does this story remind you of any western fairytales?
  • Koreans Rush to Hospital More Often Than Most
    • “As Korean society ages, the country tops OECD member states in terms of outpatient visits to hospital per person, although the number of medical professionals is smaller than the OECD average.”
      • Are you surprised?
      • Do you use outpatient services more than others?
    • “The percentage of overweight or obese people is 33.7 percent, the second lowest after Japan’s 27.2 percent. But Korea’s proportion of overweight and obese people increased from 30.5 percent in 2009 to 33.7 percent in 2019.”
      • Are you surprised?
      • Did you think the percentage would be higher or lower?
      • Do you know how they calculate “overweight”?
      • Do you know your BMI?
  • Pandemic Shoppers Stick with Tried and Tested
    • tried and tested
      • “Lockdown-addled consumers are favoring shops and restaurants they are familiar with instead of being tempted by novelty, credit card data suggest.”
        • Data suggest or suggests?
      • What do you think “tried and tested” means?
      • Do you stick with tried and tested or do you go for new and different?
      • “The main reason is that lockdown offered fewer opportunities for window shopping and leisurely exploration. The coronavirus pandemic also reduced the distances consumers traveled.”
      • “Korea Credit Data analyzed the plastic transactions of 700,000 businesses and found that spending at newly opened stores declined 27.7 percent in the first quarter of this year compared to the carefree first quarter of 2019. But in stores they had already visited in the past year, purchases declined only 8.7 percent.”
        • Who are they?
        • Does such credit card purchase tracking make you nervous?
        • Do you use cash or credit cards for your purchases?
        • Are you mindful of what you purchase with your credit card?

July 20, 2021 (12:10 pm start)

  • Sleeping longer hours correlates with IQ: study (July 20 with Carrie and Sunny)
    • The good news: “It showed that, the longer hours children sleep, the higher their IQ scores.”
    • The not so good news: “This was especially the case with boys. Boys who sleep more than 10 hours a night score 10 points higher than those who sleep less than 8 hours a night. However, the correlation was not found among girls.”
    • Did you sleep a lot, more than average, when you were a teen?
    • What did your parents think?
    • What did you think?
      • Did you want to sleep more or less?
    • Do you sleep a lot now?
      • Do you want to sleep more, less, or are you perfectly happy with your sleep schedule?
    • Do you wish that you could wake up earlier or go to bed earlier?

July 13, 2021

  • My Mother Thinks She’s a Kid (Recordings)
    • Sunny
      • Kid (short-i) vs keed (long-e)
      • Did you spend as much time on your recording this week as you did on last week’s?
  • Speaking contest
    • Live speaking contest vs. video speaking contest
    • Two first place winners and one second place
      • Eunseon was unimpressed.
        • She told me one of her students won for all of TunTun.
      • Kids were volunteers
      • Kids I wanted to enter didn’t want to.
        • (They were older and knew to be scared.)
    • What are your tips?
  • Global Audio Book: The Lazy Boy Who Turned into an Ox
    • Do you know this story?
    • Is this story well known in Korean culture?
    • Do Korean parents tell this story to their children?
    • Does this story remind you of any western fairytales?
  • The Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl
  • Next week: 12:10 pm

July 6, 2021

  • Gertie’s Garden Recordings
    • Amy
      • Such great voice characterizations.
        • The grandmother sounds old
        • Gertie sounds like a little girl
      • trowel vs. troll
        • p. 4 – “There they bought a trowel and a bright green watering can.”
        • troll vs garden gnome
          • Gnomio and Juliet
      • I can hear how well Amy planned her readings by her voice characterizations.
      • Good job reading slowly and with expression
    • Sunny
      • So much improvement in reading more slowly and with greater expression.
      • How do you read “bo-o-o-red”?
        • I had wondered how we would all interpret how to read “bo-o-o-red”
    • Carrie
      • “Gary” or “Ger-tie”
      • marigolds, not marigold. Don’t drop the plural -s
  • June / July micro-resolutions
    • How did your June micro-resolutions go?
      • Amy ->
      • Evelyn ->
      • Dana ->
      • Grace ->
      • Sunny ->
      • Carrie ->
      • Joseph -> 1 set of Push-ups and 1 set of Wim Hof Method breathing
    • How did you do with your resolutions?
  • July micro-resolutions suggestions for…
    • Amy -> Walk in the evening with kids every night.
    • Evelyn ->
    • Dana ->
    • Jenny ->
    • Sunny -> Read two books to children every night.
    • Carrie ->
    • Joseph -> Read When You Trap a Tiger to Joey and Sophie 10 mins / day before their bedtime. My goal is to finish the novel in one month.

June 29, 2021

  • Voice recordings
  • Remember that while making recordings or giving presentations to speak slower, louder, and more animated than you would normally or even normally think to do.
  • (My) Saturday’s preparation for an English speaking contest.
  • Sunny
    • American English ‘r’ vs. British English ‘r’
    • American English short-a vs. British English short-a.
    • Song: The Show – Lenka
      • Voice coach scene from Singin’ in the Rain
  • Carrie
    • w-sounds: “Hollywood” vs “Holly-ood”
    • Just like with r-sounds, Koreans (and Asians in general) must develop the mouth muscles to make w-sounds, which are made by puckering lips.
    • Song: Watermelon Sugar
  • Bangtan Boys Lyrics to Be Used as Language Teaching Material
    • “There are barely any Korean textbooks for youngsters overseas despite surging demand for language lessons,” an Education Ministry spokesman said Wednesday. “Some 60 experts will develop a curriculum for primary and secondary schools and create textbooks based on it.” They will include plenty of K-pop content like BTS lyrics and videos.
    • Are BTS songs good material to learn Korean?
    • Which songs do you recommend for Korean learners?
    • Do you use English songs in your teaching?
      • Which English songs?
      • How do you decide which English songs to use?
    • Which English songs would you like to learn?

June 22, 2021

  • Thank you

June 15, 2021

  • The Flying Squirrel Recordings
    • Sunny
      • Good expression
      • Remember to say the last sounds, plural ‘s’ and paste tense “ed”.
      • He was no “quitter” “qw”
      • Don’t think about speed while reading, think about deliberate pronunciation. When kids learn they need to hear the individual sounds.
  • Pronunciation Clinic
    • ‘th’ – sounds: “voiced” and “voiceless”
      • ð – the voiced dental fricative (as in “this”)
      • θ – the voiceless dental fricative (as in “thing”)
  1. th at the beginning of a word:
    • th is voiceless /θ/ in most cases
      • threat, thought, think, throw,
    • th is voiceless /θ/ when followed by consonants
      • three, threat
    • Function words usually begin with the voiced /ð/
      • as in the pronouns they, them, their, the, this, that, these, those 
      • and as in the adverbs and conjunctions then, there, than, thus, though, therefore, thereby, thereafter, ….
  2. th in the middle of a word:
    • Most (pure) English words have a voiced /ð/ in the middle (when there is a th)
      • as in either, father, mother, brother, rather, further, together, weather, whether, ….
    • Most loan (“foreign” English) words have a voiceless /θ/ in the middle when there is a th,
      • as in cathedral, enthusiasm, ethics, mathematics, lethal, method, mythical, …
  3. th at the end of a word:
    • Nouns and adjectives usually end in a voiceless /θ/
      • as in bath, cloth, breath, tooth, teeth, ….
    • Verbs usually end in a voiced /ð/ when there is a th
      • as in breathe, loathe, soothe, writhe, ….
  • More adverbs of frequency
    • with barely, hardly
      • Correct usage “hardly ever” and “barely ever”
      • Incorrect usage “hardly never” or “barely never”
  • Bangtan Boys Lyrics to Be Used as Language Teaching Material
    • “There are barely any Korean textbooks for youngsters overseas despite surging demand for language lessons,” an Education Ministry spokesman said Wednesday. “Some 60 experts will develop a curriculum for primary and secondary schools and create textbooks based on it.” They will include plenty of K-pop content like BTS lyrics and videos.
    • Are BTS songs good material to learn Korean?
    • Which songs do you recommend for Korean learners?
    • Which English songs would you like to learn?

June 8, 2021

  • Eric Carle, Author of ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar,’ Dies at 91
    • “A self-described ‘picture writer,’ he wrote and illustrated more than 70 books for young children, selling more than 170 million copies.”
    • In 2003, he received the prestigious Laura Ingalls Wilder Award (now called the Children’s Literature Legacy Award) from the American Library Association, which recognizes authors and illustrators whose books have created a lasting contribution to children’s literature.
    • Describing himself as a “picture writer,” Mr. Carle detailed much of his artistic process on his website.

June 1, 2021

  • Halmi-Kkut (p. 74)
    • Sunny
      • Remember not to read like a narrator. Think about the characters’ voices and feelings
      • Good job with expressing Halmi’s sadness (0:50) at not being able to give her youngest daughter a wedding.
      • Good job with oldest daughter’s initial happiness (1:30)
    • Generally – Think that you are reading for children and that you need to exaggerate emotions, tones, and actions.

May 25, 2021

  • My 80/20 life
    • Book summaries
  • Parenting
    • Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother – Amy Chua
      • What price success? (note the idiom)
      • Old cultural idiom – “What profit a man to gain the whole world but lose his soul in the process?”
      • Mark 8:36 – “For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?”
      • Matthew 16:26 – “For what profit is it to a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul?”
      • King Midas and “the Midas touch”
    • Want to Raise Successful Kids? Science Says These 7 Habits Lead to Incredible Outcomes
    • Want to Raise Successful Kids? Science Says These 7 Habits Lead to Great Outcomes. (It’s not just one study. It’s study after study after study.)
    • Want to Raise Successful Kids? The Largest Child Development Research Study In History Reveals 7 Secrets
    • Parents Of Successful Kids Do These 10 Things In Common, Science Finds
    • Science says parents of successful kids have these 24 things in common

May 18, 2021

  • Voice Recording – A Day in the Forest (p. 44)
    • Amy – A Day in the Forest
      • r – sounds
      • for’ est, not for/est
      • very good expression, use of voices
    • Dana
      • speaks with natural intonation
    • Taeyong
    • English is a stressed language
      • Korean is unstressed
    • Rule (guideline, really)
      • One syllable words
        • use and function words are usually unstressed (except for emphasis)
        • be verbs are unstressed (except for emphasis)
      • Two syllable words
      • Three syllable words
      • Four syllable words
  • What are our class’s goals?
  • How can we measure success?
  • Young Couples Woo Each Other with Samsung, Tesla Stocks
    • Did you give your boyfriends gifts while you were dating?
    • Did your boyfriends give you gifts while you were dating?
      • What kind of gifts?
    • Do you give your spouse gifts now?
    • Does your spouse give you gifts now?
      • What kind of gifts?
    • Have you heard of the book The 5 Love Languages?
      1. Words of affirmation: 23 percent
      2. Quality time: 20 percent
      3. Acts of service: 20 percent
      4. Physical touch: 19 percent
      5. Gift giving: 18 percent
    • I think I’m a little sparse on the words:
  • Buddha’s Birthday
    • Do you have plans for tomorrow?
    • What did Buddha’s Birthday mean to you when you were a child?
    • What did you do for Buddha’s Birthday?
    • What do Koreans do for Buddha’s Birthday?
    • How would you compare Buddha’s Birthday to Christmas in terms of scale (how big the holidays are) and celebration?

May 11, 2021

  • Voice Recording
    • Wactchow’s Bath Day (Jenny)
    • English is a stressed language
      • Korean is unstressed
      • English is less stressed than Italian
    • Rule (guideline, really)
      • One syllable words
        • use and function words are usually unstressed (except for emphasis)
        • be verbs are unstressed (except for emphasis)
      • Two syllable words
      • Three syllable words
      • Four syllable words

May 4, 2021

  • preconceptions
  • predictions
  • voice and tone
    • Understanding “tone” is often the most difficult part of reading comprehension. Think about how often you’ve read emails or texts and misunderstood the writers’ meaning or intention.
    • I mentioned my actor friend who told me that when actors prepare for roles that they need to find their characters’ voice.
  • Character voices
    • Have young readers read with the dialogue in the characters’ voices.
    • What do you think the characters’ voice sounds like?
      • High or low?
      • Loud or soft?
    • How do you think the character feels when the character says a specific line of dialogue?
      • Happy or sad?
      • Confident or scared?

April 27, 2021

  • Jejudo -> Jejudon’t
    • Are you disappointed?
    • Are you relieved?
    • “bittersweet”
  • Joey’s Birthday – 12 years ago today
    • Me: “I think that today is the happiest day of my life”
    • Eunseon: _____________
  • What was the happiest day of your life?
  • Predictions vs preconceptions

April 20, 2021

  • Teaching Resources:
    • Kids Club English
      • “Are you teaching EFL/ESL young learners without a coursebook? Looking for something to supplement your syllabus? Mixed ages and abilities? Want to find something more exciting and engaging to teach kids English? You’re in the right place!
    • British Council – LearnEnglish Kids
      • “LearnEnglish Kids is brought to you by the British Council, the world’s English teaching experts. We have lots of free online games, songs, stories and activities for children. For parents, we have articles on supporting children in learning English, videos on using English at home and information about English courses for your child.”
    • iSLCollective
    • ESL Hacker
  • Connotation and denotation
    • Words have denotation, dictionary definitions, and connotations, feelings.
      • 아줌마
        • denotation
        • connotation
    • Understanding meaning of new and unfamiliar words
      • context
        • Does the word feel good or bad, positive or negative?
        • etymologies
          • logos
    • Prefixes: Ben & Mal and Eu & Dis (Dys)

April 13, 2021

  • Pronunciation Clinic
  • Children’s books
    • The Five Chinese Brothers
      • Reception and controversy
        • Wikipedia: Though often considered a classic of children’s literature, The Five Chinese Brothers has been accused of promoting ethnic stereotypes about the Chinese, particularly through its illustrations, and many teachers have removed the book from their classrooms. However, the book has had some defenders. In a 1977 School Library Journal article, Selma G. Lanes described the illustrations as “cheerful and highly appealing”, characterizing Wiese’s “broad cartoon style” as “well suited to the folk-tale, a genre which deals in broad truths”. She added, “I cannot remember a tale during my childhood that gave me a cozier sense of all being right with the world.”
  • Examining The Five Chinese Brothers
    • Complaint #1: everyone in the crowd looks exactly alike in a stereotypical way.
    • Complaint #2: Chinese people are not yellow like that.
    • Complaint #3: Not only the people in the crowd, the other characters all look the same, too.
    • Complaint #4: these people all have the stereotypical slanted eyes.
    • Complaint #5: Bishop didn’t cite a source of this “Chinese” tale.
  • Scholastic.com: Teaching “The Five Chinese Brothers”
  • The Little Engine That Could
  • February micro-resolutions
    • February suggestions for..
      • Amy -> throw out/recycle/donate one thing per day
      • Evelyn -> active listening
      • Dana -> practice guitar
      • Grace -> No TV
      • Joseph -> throw away/give away one item per day
    • How did you do with your resolutions?
  • April micro-resolutions suggestions for…
    • Amy ->
    • Evelyn ->
    • Dana ->
    • Jenny ->
    • Sunny ->
    • Carrie ->
    • 조희경 ->
    • Joseph -> (w/Joey) 100 push-ups per day / 150 situps
  • One of my best micro-resolutions was to work on my client outreach & development for 30 minutes every day.
  • YouTube Videos Shift to Cooking as Pandemic Drags On
    • Has your coronavirus TV / YouTube viewing changed during the coronavirus?
    • Article: “With the coronavirus pandemic showing no signs of a letup, YouTube videos are shifting from ‘mukbang’ (a portmanteau in Korean of ‘eating’ and ‘broadcast’) to ‘cookbang’ (‘cooking’ and ‘broadcast’).’
      • What does “portmanteau” mean?
        • What does “port” mean?
        • Etymology, word origin (in this context) :
          • Lewis Carroll used “portmanteau”, which was a type of luggage, in “Through the Looking-Glass”. Humpty Dumpty explained to Alice the coinage of unusual words used in “Jabberwocky”. “Slithy” meant “slimy and lithe” and mimsy meant “miserable and flimsy”. Humpty Dumpty explained to Alice combining words in various ways: “You see it’s like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.”
    • Do you know any portmanteaus?
      • smog
      • motel
      • brunch
      • Microsoft
      • dramady / sitcom / romcom
      • frenemy
        • (Note: none of the above results in a red squiggly line underneath it.)
    • Portmanteaus vs. compound words
      • watermelon
      • starfish
    • Why are Koreans particularly keen on portmanteaus?
    • What are your favorite portmanteaus?
    • Where is Korea’s list of portmanteaus?
      • French, Hebrew, Spanish, and Japanese have their own Wikipedia sections.
      • Do you want to write our own list for Wikipedia?
        • What words should we include?
    • List of portmanteaus (English)
  • S-V-O – Subject-Verb-Object. Right?
  • Micro-resolutions
  • TEFL / TESOL Certification:
    • You Can Now Gain Your TEFL Certificate for Free by just paying the certificate fee. The course typically costs $199 but you can join today for just $27. Become a Certified TEFL Teacher After Just Two Weeks Online Training! The “Teaching English as a Foreign Language” industry has become one of the leading online sectors in 2020. With more vacant positions than teachers to fill them, the time has never been better for you to gain your TEFL certificate.
    • This course typically costs $199, but you can access it today for FREE.
    • What’s the catch? You have to pay the $27 certification fee, and you get full access to the certificate course.
    • Here’s what you get:

April 6, 2021

  • Last week
    • MT?
    • Girl’s day out?
      • “girl’s night out”
      • American vs Korean culture
  • Easter
    • Which do you prefer, Easter or Christmas? (idiomatic form)
    • Which, Easter or Christmas, do you prefer? (appositive form)
    • The Ten Commandments – an Easter tradition
    • Easter & Passover – “Holy Week”
    • Easter Ash Wednesday + 40
    • Lent
    • Giving something up for Lent
    • Easter Sunday / Easter baskets / Easter Bunny
    • Easter eggs / dyeing Easter eggs
  • “April is the cruelest month” ~ T.S. Eliot
    • Is April the cruelest month?
  • Do certain months have certain feelings for you?
    • Song: Watermelon Sugar

      Tastes like strawberries
      On a Summer evening
      And it sounds just like a song
      ….
      Strawberries
      On Summer evening
      Baby, you’re the end of June
    • “September of My Years” ~ Frank Sinatra

March 30, 2021

No class

March 23, 2021

  • The first day of Spring
    • Spring Equinox
      • equi + nox
    • Explaining seasons to kids
      • Explaining seasons to yourselves
    • Do you like Spring?
      • What’s to like?
        • “what’s to…” (spoken idiom)
      • What’s to dislike?
      • Do you remember PREP?
    • What are your spring activities?
  • St. Patrick’s Day (March 17)
    • St. Joseph’s Day (March 19)
  • What are some minor Korean holidays, holidays that are not red days but Koreans have some kinds of customs, traditions, or activities?
    • April 1, April Fool’s Day
    • Which do you like?
    • Which can you do without, dislike?
  • YouTube Videos Shift to Cooking as Pandemic Drags On
    • Has your coronavirus TV / YouTube viewing changed during the coronavirus?
    • Article: “With the coronavirus pandemic showing no signs of a letup, YouTube videos are shifting from ‘mukbang’ (a portmanteau in Korean of ‘eating’ and ‘broadcast’) to ‘cookbang’ (‘cooking’ and ‘broadcast’).’
      • What does “portmanteau” mean?
        • What does “port” mean?
        • Etymology, word origin (in this context) :
          • Lewis Carroll used “portmanteau”, which was a type of luggage, in “Through the Looking-Glass”. Humpty Dumpty explained to Alice the coinage of unusual words used in “Jabberwocky”. “Slithy” meant “slimy and lithe” and mimsy meant “miserable and flimsy”. Humpty Dumpty explained to Alice combining words in various ways: “You see it’s like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.”
    • Do you know any portmanteaus?
      • smog
      • motel
      • brunch
      • Microsoft
      • dramady / sitcom / romcom
      • frenemy
        • (Note: none of the above results in a red squiggly line underneath it.)
    • Portmanteaus vs. compound words
      • watermelon
      • starfish
    • Why are Koreans particularly keen on portmanteaus?
    • What are your favorite portmanteaus?
    • Where is Korea’s list of portmanteaus?
      • French, Hebrew, Spanish, and Japanese have their own Wikipedia sections.
      • Do you want to write our own list for Wikipedia?
        • What words should we include?
    • List of portmanteaus (English)

March 16, 2021

  • Making stretch bracelets
    • How did it go?
    • What did you learn?
    • What was successful?
    • What would you do differently next time?
    • Did you write everything down?
  • Beware the Ides of March
    • The single most important date in history
  • Gerunds
    • What are gerunds?
    • Do you understand how to use gerunds?
    • Do you understand where we use gerunds?
  • World’s Best Cities – a Ranking
    • Which are the best cities you’ve been to?
    • If you could live in any city, which cities would be on your top-3 list?
    • What criteria, judging reasons, do you use for best cities?
    • Seoul is on the list. Where do you think Seoul ranks?
    • View the complete report from Resonance Consultancy.

March 9, 2021

  • New class member – 조희경
    • Greetings
    • What are your interests?
      • What are everyone else’s interests?
  • What is a sentence?
  • Independent clauses
  • Dependent clauses
  • TEFL / TESOL Certification:
    • You Can Now Gain Your TEFL Certificate for Free by just paying the certificate fee. The course typically costs $199 but you can join today for just $27. Become a Certified TEFL Teacher After Just Two Weeks Online Training! The “Teaching English as a Foreign Language” industry has become one of the leading online sectors in 2020. With more vacant positions than teachers to fill them, the time has never been better for you to gain your TEFL certificate.
    • This course typically costs $199, but you can access it today for FREE.
    • What’s the catch? You have to pay the $27 certification fee, and you get full access to the certificate course.
    • Here’s what you get:
  • February micro-resolutions
    • February suggestions for..
      • Amy -> throw out/recycle/donate one thing per day
      • Evelyn -> active listening
      • Dana -> practice guitar
      • Grace -> No TV
      • Joseph -> throw away/give away one item per day
    • How did you do with your resolutions?
  • March micro-resolutions suggestions for…
    • Amy ->
    • Evelyn ->
    • Dana ->
    • Grace ->
    • 조희경 ->
    • Joseph ->
  • One of my best micro-resolutions was to work on my client outreach & development for 30 minutes every day.
  • Are extracurricular activities important?
    • Word part extra – “outside of”
      • extraordinary
      • extraterrestrial
        • terre – Earth
        • Mediterranean Sea
        • Terran (in sci-fi)
      • extramarital
    • Did you do any extracurricular activities?
      • In middle school?
      • In high school?
      • In university?
    • What are the benefits and detriments of extracurricular activities for students?
      • better grades
      • time management
      • self-esteem
      • skills
    • Which extracurricular activities do you wish that you had done?
    • Which extracurricular activities do you recommend to others?
    • Which extracurricular activities do you think are not so important?
    • If you recommend one extracurricular activity to students at each level (middle school, high school, and university) which extracurricular activity would you recommend?

February 22, 2021

  • Is Grace still Jenny?
  • Does anyone else want a name change?
  • Comparisons with as and than
    • spoken English and formal written English
    • transitive and intransitive verbs
      • transitive verbs take an object (trans means across)
      • intransitive verbs don’t take an object (in means not)
      • some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive, depending on context.
    • “Does mommy love chocolate more than me?”
      • Compare:
        1. She runs 10k races faster than me.
        2. He loves her more than me.
      • Compare:
        1. She runs 10k races as fast as me.
        2. He loves her as much as me.
        3. Daddy loves baby as much as mommy.
  • When You Trap a Tiger, a Newbery Award, “the Noble prize of children’s literature”, winner.
    • by Tae Keller was a child author and daughter of Nora Okja Keller.
    • “…the story of Lily and her relationship with her aging and ill Korean grandmother, wrapped around the Korean folktales her grandmother tells her at bedtime.”
    • Have you heard of this book, When You Trap a Tiger?
    • Which Korean folktales do you know?
      • Do you tell your children?
      • Why do we tell our children of such folktales?
        • Culture
          • Which stories and folk tales are most important in and to Korean culture?
        • Cultural literacy
          • What is cultural literacy?
          • Are you culturally literate?
          • Are your children / family culturally literate?
          • What should Koreans know to be culturally literate?
        • Moral teaching
          • What stories are part of Korean moral teaching?
          • American children’s stories:
            • The Little Engine That Could
            • Aesop’s Fables
              • The Ant and the Grasshopper
              • The Boy Who Cried Wolf
              • (What are the moral lessons?)
            • Rip Van Winkel

February 15, 2021

New Year’s Celebrations
  • Do Koreans do something special for Seollal, lunar new year?
  • Do you or your family have special or different observations, way of celebrating or “observing”, the lunar new year?
  • What do you do for solar new year, New Year’s Day, January 1?
  • When you were young(er), which was more important solar new year or lunar new year?
    • Which did you consider the new year?
  • Did you go to a sauna or solar new year or lunar new year?
  • Did you watch the sunrise on solar new year or lunar new year?
  • Speaking test question:
    • Tell me about an important holiday in your country
    • How is the way people celebrate the holiday today different from the way they celebrated in the past?

February 8, 2021

  • Saturday’s special class – Origami Folding Calendar
    • What went right?
    • What needs improvement?
    • What did you learn for next time?
      • Did you write everything down?
  • February micro-resolutions
    • February suggestions for…
      • Amy -> throw out/recycle/donate one thing per day
      • Evelyn -> active listening
      • Dana -> practice guitar
      • Grace -> No TV
      • Joseph -> throw away/give away one item per day
  • Decluttering and simplifying
    • Danish Death Cleaning
      • döstädning-from Swedish, dö (death) + städning (cleaning)
      • From the same culture that brings us hygge
      • Main idea: slowly begin decluttering so that your death isn’t such a burden for those you leave behind
        • “When it comes to death cleaning, an important thing to remember is that it’s meant to be hard, but not sad.”
        • “Will Anyone be Happier if I Save This?”
        • “Let me help make your loved ones’ memories of you nice — instead of awful,” she writes. “A loved one wishes to inherit nice things from you. Not all things from you.”
    • Marie Kondo
      • “Does it spark joy?”
    • What’s the difference?
  • Korea’s purple island makes CNN
    • Have you heard of it?
    • Would you want to go?
    • Great idea or crass marketing stunt?
      • What does crass mean?

February 1, 2021

January 25, 2021

  • Teaching 3-Layer Strawberry Jam Muffins
    • How did “3-Layer Strawberry Jam Muffins” class go?
      • What went right?
      • What went wrong (“needs improvement”)?
      • Did you write everything that you had learned down?
        • “Did…write …you had learned….” (verb tense?)
    • What did you learn from teaching “3-Layer Strawberry Jam Muffins” class?
    • Do you have suggestions for the 3-Layer Strawberry Jam Muffins post?
  • What are your winter weekend plans?
    • I want to go skiing with my family
      • Have you ever been skiing?
      • Do you have any recommendations, “do’s and don’ts”
        • “do’s and don’ts” is an idiom. What do you think that “do’s and don’ts” means?
  • Reading
    • What are your favorite books for teaching English reading?
    • What do you look for in selecting, choosing, books for your young learners?
      • Moral
      • Idioms and expressions
      • Pictures
      • “Cultural literacy”
    • Which books were you most successful with?
    • Which books were you not so successful with?
      • What makes successful books for teaching successful?
      • What makes unsuccessful books for teaching unsuccessful?
    • Which books were your favorite books when you were a child?
      • Why?
    • Here’s my most memorable book from when I was a child:
      • .
      • “I think I can… I think I can… I think I can….
      • “I thought I could… I thought I could… I thought I could….”
        • Moral lessons: perseverance, self-confidence, belief in one’s self.
      • Story follows a classic five-part story in both structure AND the plot as a metaphor itself
      • I think that if I teach it to young Korean children, EFL learners, I would rewrite, simplify, the story.
        • (Do you see the appositives?)
        • Note that the story is “out of copyright”

January 18, 2021

January 11, 2021

  • Special Zoom Class
MonthAmyDanaEvelynGraceJoseph
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
  • I have 12 micro-resolutions. How many did you make?
  • Joseph’s plans / ideas / possibilities for micro-resolutions:
    1. Obey all traffic laws
    2. Study / learn Korean for 10 mins per day
    3. Make one teaching lesson plan per day.
    4. Live an 80 / 20 life
      • Realize that I get 80% of benefits from 20% of resources, which means time, effort, cost, etc.
        • Limit myself to 1 hour TV to force myself to only view the best
        • Limit Social media (Facebook) to 30 minutes total per day
        • Read non-fiction 80 / 20
        • __________
        • __________
    5. Train with my son Joey for a 10K road race with the goal of finishing in under 1 hour
    6. Play / practice / learn chess for 10 minutes per day
    7. Write a book, “10 Minutes”, about my 10-minute life.
    8. NO TV
    9. Start my TESOL Certification course on Coursera and work on it for 1 hour per day. (I should be able to finish 2 or 3 and maybe 4 of the eight classes if I work at that pace.)
      • Are you interested in TESOL , CELTA, DELTA, or TEFL certification?
      • …maybe do TESOL Certification in the same month as NO TV month?
    10. Contact one friend, colleague, former client, etc. per day and take a genuine interest in what they’ve been up to just because (“for no better reason than to”) reestablish our relationship.
    11. Spend 30 minutes per day making business contacts, sending resumes, applying for jobs.
    12. Read four books by using the post-it flag method

Reading

  • What grades are your students in?
  • What are their reading levels?
  • What books do you read with them?
  • I’m reading The Hundred Dresses with Korean fifth graders:
    • Have you read The Hundred Dresses?
  • Do you want to read an English book in our class?
    • Which book do you want to read?
  • What is the difference between “what” and “which”?
    • “What books do you read with them?”
    • “Which book do you want to read?”
      • We don’t have a “hard and fast” rule; we only have a feeling.
      • “Hard and fast” means “solid (hard) and stick to (fast, fasten).
  • Three Wishes
    • What would you wish for if you had three wishes?

Be careful what you wish for. You just might get it.

If you had three wishes, what would you wish for?

  1. Do you wish that you had so much money that you would never have to work?
  2. Do you wish that everyday was a holiday in your favorite place like heaven?
  3. Do you wish that you were so handsome or beautiful that everyone liked you just by looking at you?
  4. Do you wish that you could live for 1,000 years in the full flower of youth?
    • What do you think “the full flower of youth” means?
  5. Do you wish that you were so good that you could win at everything?

January 4, 2021

Happy New Year !

  • What do Koreans do on January 1, at the New Year?
  • What are you going to do?
  • Why is January called “January”?

Janus, the god for whom January is named, was an important god in the Roman pantheon (pan +theos). Janus was the Roman “god of doors”, and nearly all Roman households had an altar to Janus.

What? A god of doors?

…and Endings. Every ending is a beginning, and every beginning is an ending.

Janus is often depicted (de+pict+ed) as a two-faced god with the younger boyish face looking forward to the future and the older bearded face looking back at the past.

December 28, 2020

  • Top 10 social topics by keyword on Korean Twitter in 2020:
    • 1) COVID-19
    • 2) Nth Room
    • 3) Self-quarantine
    • 4) Social distancing
    • 5) Feminism
    • 6) Sewol
    • 7) Emergency relief funding
    • 8) Prosecution reform
    • 9) Sarang Jaeil Church
    • 10) Illegal abortion
      • Do you have a Twitter account?
        • Do you tweet?
        • Are you active on Twitter?
      • Do you know these Top-10 in Korea terms?
      • Do you have other social media accounts?
        • Are you active on those social media accounts?

December 21, 2020

MERRY CREEPY CHRISTMAS

Elf on a Shelf – Friend or foe?

December 14, 2020

December 7, 2020

November 30, 2020

  • Song: Are you sleeping?
  • Do you have a morning routine?
    • “The Miracle Morning” – Hal Elrod
    • S.A.V.E.R.S. – 1 hour
      • Silence, Affirmations, Visualization, Exercise, Reading, Scribing
  • Collin’s Dictionary 2020 Word of the Year
  • Special Topics

November 23, 2020

Norman Rockwell – Thanksgiving

November 16, 2020

  • Triskaidekaphobia and paraskevidekatriaphobia 
    • Last Friday was Friday 13th
      • What do you think Triskaidekaphobia means?
      • -phobia
        • Do you have any phobias?
      • Common phobias
    • Are you superstitious?
      • What is “super”?
    • Are Koreans superstitious?
      • How or why do you think these superstitions developed?
    • What are your personal superstitions?

November 9, 2020

November 2, 2020

Once in a blue moon….
  • Halloween
    • Why do we call Halloween “Halloween”?
    • Do you like Halloween?
    • Did you go trick or treating when you were a child?
    • Do you think that Koreans will pick up Halloween as a holiday?
    • Which Korean holiday do you think would make a good holiday for the rest of the world to pick up?
  • What do you think of Korea borrowing other western or American holidays?
    • Valentine’s Day
    • Christmas
    • (Solar) New Year’s Day
    • Do you do anything special on those new Korean holidays?
    • Which is your favorite 14th of the month holiday?
  • Halloween 2020’s Blue Moon – “Once in a blue moon”

October 26, 2020

  • Special Topics
    • Making Sugar Clay Flower Muffins
    • Lonely Planet ranks ultimate travel destinations in new list
      • What do you look for in a vacation destination?
        • relaxation, adventure, nature, culture, history, art, special interest
      • Where is your ultimate vacation destination?
      • What was your best vacation?
      • What would you advise someone against?
      • What are your best vacation / travel tips?
    • S. Korea finds no evidence of flu vaccine’s role in reported deaths
      • What vaccines have you had?
        • What is the verb tense?
        • What does the verb tense mean?
      • Do you get flu or other vaccinations that are recommended but not required?
      • Have you ever had a flu vaccine?
        • Note the use of “ever”. What verb tense does “ever” indicate?
      • Government says flu vaccines are safe, will not halt program
        • Do you believe the government?
      • Will you get a flu vaccine this year?
      • Will you get a corona virus vaccine?
        • If so, how soon after a vaccine is developed?
    • Discussion Graphics – 2

October 19, 2020

  • Special Topics
    • Making Sugar Clay Flower Muffins
    • ‘K English’ spreads through K-pop
    • Do you know the meaning of these K-pop created neologisms, new words? (What do you think neologisms means? How do you know? What are the three ways we practiced to figure out the meanings of words?)
      • “Choae”
      • “Bolmae”
      • “Maknae”
      • “Ipdeok”
      • “Taldeok”
      • hocance
      • Do you feel old now?
    • Tteokbokki voted No. 1 comfort food amid pandemic
      • What does “comfort food” mean?
      • Do you have a comfort food?
      • What do you “reach for” when you want comfort food?
        • Can you guess what Americans reach for as comfort food?
      • What “triggers” your desire for comfort food?
      • When and where do you eat your comfort food?
      • How do you feel afterwards?

October 12, 2020

October 5, 2020

  • Special Topics
    • Season’s First Ice Reported on Mt. Seorak
      • It’s the first time the temperature fell below zero during the fall season this year.
      • Compared to last year, the first ice at Seorak came four days early.
        • Is “four days early” significant?
        • Do you think this winter will be colder than average, warmer than average, or about average?
    • Discussion Graphics- 1

September 28, 2020

  • Special Topics
    • Design your own Bingo game
    • How would you make your own Bingo cards?
    • Where would you start?
      • Goals
    • What would you put on your Bingo cards?
      • B – Numbers: math operations
      • I – Colors: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, black, white, gold, silver, pink,
      • N – Animals: dog, cat, cow, sheep, horse, pig, chicken, octopus,
      • G – Fruits & Vegetables
      • O – Jobs: teacher, police officer, fire fighter, pilot, bus driver, mail carrier, doctor, scientist, sales clerk
    • Simple Card Games
      • War
      • Go Fish
      • Crazy-8s
  • Korea’s Peak Foliage Season
  • LG Electronics to Release Hair Growth Helmet

September 21, 2020

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